Chocolate Coconut Fig Bites

 

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried figs (I use mission style)
  • 1 1/2 cup raw cashews
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened shredded coconut (or if you only have sweetened, cut the honey in half)
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons honey
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon himalayan sea salt (or other course sea salt)

 

Kitchen Tools

  • food processor
  • OR a really legit blender

 

Instructions

  1. Measure 2 cups of figs into the food processor. Remove stems from figs, if needed.
  2. Add cashews and shredded coconut and process until the mixture reaches a sand texture.
  3. Then add coconut oil, honey, vanilla extract, cocoa powder and sea salt. Blend until the mixture begins to clump together. (It will still look pretty dry at this point.)
  4. Use your hands to form the mixture into balls. If you’re finding it too dry and the mixture won’t stick together, process it for another minute or two. If it’s still too dry, add a half teaspoon of coconut oil at a time until you reach a desired texture.
  5. I store mine in an air tight container in the fridge. They’re good for about a week…if they last you that long!

More from the journal

5 tips for the procrastinating host

Be realistic about what you have on your plate. Is this a crazy season of life for you? Plan for shortcuts. Serve cheese and grapes instead of the wrapped baked brie. Find the best gathering hacks and stick to them. We often procrastinate when the task at hand seems overwhelming. Be kind to yourself and keep it simple.

A peek inside my cabinets | the hassle free pantry that’s always ready for guests

Somewhere along the way as our culture broke free from social pressures to entertain and get family dinner on the table by 5pm, we lost the habit of gathering. We let food become fast and convenient, cooking a necessary evil to outsource. It’s funny how that happens with change. We often swing wide in the opposite direction for a while, working so intensely to steer clear of past baggage and mistakes that we lose the goodness that thing had in the first place. The goodness, in this case, being the joy and downright holiness of the kitchen.